Industrial pc and embedded computer

In all, inevitably, the embedded computer types of processors that will succeed in the future will be the SoCs that provide hardware-accelerated functions. It’s the only way that applications will be able to meet their performance-power budgets. In other words, with homogeneous SMP devices, the embedded computer performance gained by increased core count is not scalable. For example, the more cores that share a common bus structure, the more that each core must compete for memory bandwidth. This problem can be alleviated by designing chips that divide cores into clusters, where each cluster can operate autonomously if necessary.

What plans does the EEMBC have to expand its offerings in the future, and how can the industry get involved?

refer to: http://embedded-computing.com/articles/moving-qa-markus-levy-founder-president-eembc/

 

DRAM failure prevention from solution support

An analysis of the failure modes of DRAM in memory embedded modules has determined that DRAM components with suboptimal reliability tend to fail during the first three months of use. As newer DRAMs advance to smaller process geometries, there can be a greater risk for chips that contain weak bits (a microscopic defect in an individual cell). This is not enough to cause a DRAM failure outright, but could exhibit a single-bit error within weeks after initial field operation begins. Using Test During Burn-In (TDBI) helps eliminate any potential early failures and improve the overall reliability of memory products. Although most DRAM chips undergo a static burn-in at the chip level, TDBI offers a more comprehensive testing approach that implements a 24-hour burn-in test at the module level while dynamically running and checking test patterns as the module is performing under stress conditions. Studies conducted by various memory embedded manufacturers show that using TDBI chambers can reduce early failures by up to 90 percent.

refer to: http://embedded-computing.com/articles/ruggedization-memory-module-design/

Creating the Raspberry Pi credit card sized

Embedded PC, in vehicle PC, Industrial PC

 

The initial goal in creating the Raspberry Pi credit card sized, Linux-based Single Board Computer (SBC) – targeted primarily at education – was to develop a response to the decline of students engaging with computer science and related engineering disciplines. Our desire was to reverse the trend of children becoming consumers rather than creators. The following case study follows the hardware development process from an early failure, initial prototypes, and through to the finished production design.
Over recent years there has been an increasing trend for children to be consumers of digital content rather than be future creators or engineers. This trend is driven by manufacturers looking to provide a seamless experience for target customers on a variety of electronic platforms, from gaming consoles to tablets and laptop computers. As a result, access to raw I/O has become restricted. Similarly, any packaged provision of a programming environment is an anathema to the products’ commercial goals.  ……..

refer to :http://embedded-computing.com/articles/case-card-sized-sbc/

What about cloud computing and clots?

In vehicle computer, single board computer, Industrial PC

 

However, once the first bank became a victim, immediately all the other institutions started to learn more about the attacks, search for solutions, then deploy those solutions quickly. When I look at military cloud security solutions, there are many vendors and partners providing tools and solutions, but not many providing availability security embedded computer attacks are hurting the availability of online services and many antivirus vendors and firewall vendors do not focus on the availability aspect.”  Cloud providers find protecting the shared infrastructure can be challenging because it is an expensive up-front cost, he continues. 

 

refer to : http://mil-embedded.com/articles/cloud-security-the-dod/

Eables remote desktops for C4ISR

In vehicle computer, single board computer,  Industrial PC

 

 

Virtualization trends in commercial computing offer benefits for cost, reliability, and security, but pose a challenge for military operators who need to visualize lossless imagery in real time. 10 GbE technology enables a standard zero client solution for viewing pixel-perfect C4ISR sensor and graphics information with near zero interactive latency.
For C4ISR systems, ready access to and sharing of visual information at any operator position can increase situational awareness and mission effectiveness. Operators utilize multiple information sources including computers and camera feeds, as well as high-fidelity radar and sonar imagery. Deterministic real-time interaction with remote computers and sensors is required to shorten decision loops and enable rapid actions.

…..

Gaming board with AMD Embedded G-Series T56N APU

In vehicle computer, single board computer, Industrial PC

 A new All-in-One Gaming Board, the AMB-A55EG1. AMB-A55EG1 features AMD Embedded G-Series T56N 1.65GHz dual-core APU, two DDR3-1333 SO-DIMM, which provides great computing and graphic performance is suitable for casino gaming and amusement applications. It is designed to comply with the most gaming regulations including GLI, BMM, and Comma 6A. AMB-A55EG1 is specifically designed to be a cost competitive solution for the entry-level gaming market.

AMB-A55EG1 utilizes the functions of an X86 platform, 72-pin Gaming I/O interface, intrusion detection and also various security options, and a complete line of Application Programming Interfaces to create smoother gaming development.

Key features of AMB-A55EG1:

● AMD Embedded G-Series T56N 1.65GHz dual-core APU

● 2 DDR3 SO-DIMM slot support to max 8GB

● 1 VGA port + 1 HDMI port

● 72-pin golden finger interface

● 256KB battery back-up SRAM with battery low monitor 

● 2 ccTalk ports

● 1 Gigabit Ethernet port

● 6 USB ports

● 2 SATA ports + 1 mSATA port

● 2 Intrusion Detection door switches

● Hardware security by FPGA + PIC

● 5.1 channels with 2 channel amplifier (6W x 2)

 

acrosser AMB-A55EG1 is powered by AMD low power G-Series T56N dual core platform that uses an AMD Radeon HD 6320 graphic controller.  The DirectX® 11 support lets you enjoy awesome graphics performance, stunning 3D visual effects and dynamic interactivity. Discrete-level GPU with OpenGL 4.0 and OpenCL™ 1.1 support device provides the tools to build the designs of tomorrow, today.

In conclusion, AMB-A55EG1 bridges Acrosser’s innovated gaming solutions and AMD Embedded G-Series APU to bring the optimum combination of computing power, graphic performance, and gaming features. Acrosser supports all gaming products in Windows XP Pro, XP embedded and mainstream Linux operation system with complete software development kit (SDK).  In addition, Acrosser’s gaming platforms have a minimum 5-year availability to fulfill the demand of long term supply in gaming industry.

 

For more information on AMB-A55EG1 or any other products, please contact your local Acrosser sales channel or logon to our website: www.acrosser.com

 

Metal texture is the solution

In vehicle computer, single board computer, Industrial PC

In vehicle computer, single board computer, Industrial PC

For the critical embedded computer industry, electronics reliability is not merely a desirable attribute – it’s a definite must-have. Consequently, VITA’s 51.0 and related reliability prediction standards, in addition to its  Embedded Computer, aim to develop standards and guidelines to make reliability prediction more manageable.

Computer reliability has been near the top of the list of concerns for system developers since the dawn of the computer. The level of reliability has increased multifold over the years, making  embedded computer reliable enough for even the most critical applications.

refer to: http://vita-technologies.com/articles/vita-and-reliability-reliability-prediction-challenges/

 

What about embedded mobile market?

In vehicle computer, single board computer, Industrial PC

In vehicle computer, single board computer, Industrial PC

Mobile Battery life

Mobile computing has always required a balance of embedded performance and power consumption. The combination of smaller form factors and consumers demanding more out of their devices has led chip designers to develop ways around the power/performance gap. Without cutting power altogether, designers turn to techniques like clock scaling, where embedded processor speeds vary based on the intensity of a task. Designers have also reverted to dual- and quad-core processors that decrease power while still delivering performance. As consumers continue to trend toward an “always on, always connected” experience, processors must become more powerful and more energy efficient.

Connectivity

The way consumers use computing devices is drastically changing, as their primary computing devices are no longer stationary, but carried paltform around in their pockets, bags, and purses. The number of mobile connected devices will exceed the world’s population in 2012, according to industry studies. By 2016 there will be more than 10 billion mobile Internet connections around the world, with 8 billion of them being personal devices and 2 billion Machine-to-Machine (M2M) connections.

 refer to:http://embedded-computing.com/articles/matching-cores-demands-always-mobile-applications/#at_pco=cfd-1.0

About boost network capacity

IT managers are under increasing pressure to boost network capacity and performance to cope with the data deluge. Networking systems are under a similar form of stress with their performance degrading as new capabilities are added in software. The solution to both needs is next-generation System-on-Chip (SoC) communications processors that combine multiple cores with multiple hardware acceleration engines.

In-Vehicle Computer. single board computer, Industrial PC

 

Missing layer of security in connected embedded devices

In vehicle computer, single board computer, Industrial PC

In vehicle computer, single board computer, Industrial PC

IDC is predicting that 15 billion intelligent devices will be connected to the Internet by 2015. This explosion in connected embedded devices has spawned a new generation of hackers targeting mobile devices, automobiles, medical equipment, and other systems. Alan discusses what these latest security threats to embedded devices look like and what steps companies should take to protect their devices from attacks launched via the Internet.

refer:

http://embedded-computing.com/articles/the-president-cofounder-icon-labs/